Massive Gaps in Accessibility for Canadians with Disabilities

Canada

Author: Rick Hansen Foundation & Angus Reid Institute
Published: 2015/12/04 - Updated: 2020/12/02
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Report reveals Canadians see gaps in accessibility within their own communities and believe Canada should be a leader in removing barriers. When asked to rate the current state of their own communities versus how accessible communities should be, respondents saw vast room for improvement. As we mark the UN's International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the Rick Hansen Foundation wants to shine a light on accessibility and disability in Canada.

Introduction

Canadians see massive gaps in accessibility within their own communities and believe Canada should be a leader in removing barriers, according to a new national survey that highlights the problems facing people with disabilities today.

Main Digest

Released on the United Nation's International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the survey shows respondents strongly agree that accessibility is a basic human right and not a privilege, but indicated that communities have a long way to go to reach the ideal level of access for all.

The International Day of Persons with Disabilities, which falls annually on December 3, is an international observance promoted by the United Nations since 1992. The observance day aims to promote understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. The International Day of Persons with Disabilities also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

When asked to rate the current state of their own communities versus how accessible communities should be, respondents saw vast room for improvement. The public also believes Canada should be a world leader in accessibility, feeling strongly that ensuring people with physical disabilities can fully participate in life should be a high priority for the country.

This data, gathered from a randomized sample of 1,527 Canadians, is part of a national public opinion poll canvassing disability and accessibility conducted by the Angus Reid Institute, in partnership with the Rick Hansen Foundation.

Key Findings Include:

"As we mark the UN's International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the Rick Hansen Foundation wants to shine a light on accessibility and disability in Canada. This report reveals an urgent need for change, not just because it's the right thing to do, but because more than one billion people around the world are not living to their full potential," says Rick Hansen, CEO of the Rick Hansen Foundation.

"It's now time for the public and private sectors, government, organizations and businesses to join together and make Canada a leader in accessibility. Join us in liberating the amazing potential of people with disabilities," says Rick Hansen, CEO of the Rick Hansen Foundation.

"The Angus Reid Institute was established to enhance and encourage better understanding of everyday issues that affect people in this country. This in-depth survey reveals four distinct mindsets among Canadians in terms of how they view accessibility and disability issues: the On-Side, Young Bystanders, the Older Detached and the Indifferent. Understanding these distinct groups will go a long way to furthering discussion and comprehension of how Canadians can close the accessibility gaps identified in this research," says Shachi Kurl, Senior Vice President, Angus Reid Institute.

Read the full report:

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by Rick Hansen Foundation & Angus Reid Institute, and published on 2015/12/04 (Edit Update: 2020/12/02), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, Rick Hansen Foundation & Angus Reid Institute can be contacted at rickhansen.com - angusreid.com. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): Rick Hansen Foundation & Angus Reid Institute. (2015, December 4 - Last revised: 2020, December 2). Massive Gaps in Accessibility for Canadians with Disabilities. Disabled World. Retrieved July 14, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/news/canada/ca-accessibility.php

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