Prosthetics Costs

Synopsis:

Published 2009-05-30 -- A lower extremity prosthesis leg can range in cost from $5,000.00 to $50,000.

Author: Rhonda Turner, PhD

Main Document

How much does "an arm and a leg" really cost? A lower extremity prosthesis (leg) can range in cost from $5,000.00 to $50,000. An upper extremity device (arm) can range from $3,000.00 to $30,000. Why the difference and why not just give everyone the less expensive variation

Prosthetics - An Explanation of Cost

Why pay for a Cadillac, when a Chevy will do

How does the saying go? If I had a nickel..So it goes with this phrase; repeated by rehabilitation claims reviewers and insurance payers, demonstrating that there is a growing national trend towards evaluating the medical necessity of a claim simply for its overall cost.

Generally, an understanding exists between payer and beneficiary, that any catastrophic, illness or event involves an issue of financial responsibility. However, the expectation persists that insurance will provide for the purchased services.

How much does 'an arm and a leg' really cost

A lower extremity prosthesis (leg) can range in cost from $5,000.00 to $50,000. An upper extremity device (arm) can range from $3,000.00 to $30,000. Why the difference and why not just give everyone the less expensive variation

Cost does not define medical appropriateness.

An amputee's residuum, age, daily activities, profession and certain health factors determine the specific materials and technologies used for each custom manufactured device. A prosthetic device can be body powered or computerized, made of aluminum, stainless steel, titanium, plastics or carbon composites. A prosthetic is device is made up of moving parts. Parts wear down; interfaces need replacement. Humans grow, gain or loose weight, change in shape. All of these factors contribute to need and cost.

What are the costs of denying someone a prosthetic device

The California Health Benefits Review Program determined the cost of California State parity would be approximately $.25 per insured member. Additionally, a recent survey found that every $1 dollar spent on rehabilitation saves the economy $11 dollars in various welfare and disability benefits. On the other hand, a person who does not receive a prosthetic within 2 years of amputation has a greater likelihood of social welfare, increased health concerns including obesity related diseases and conditions and is more likely to suffer depression. The US amputee population is approximately 1.9 million persons and growing, however science and medicine provide the technology to restoring a person's dignity, self-reliance, productivity and ability to contribute to society.

In consideration, the benefits to the person and to the community far outweigh the cost of provision.

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