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Only 31% of London Underground Stations are Fully Accessible

Published: 2021-09-09
Author: Bolt Burdon Kemp | Contact: boltburdonkemp.co.uk

Synopsis: Reports by Transport Focus, the Department for Transport and the Research Institute for Disabled Consumers have uncovered that travelling on public transport continues to be difficult for disabled passengers.. The Covid-19 pandemic has had a drastic effect on the lives of disabled people. From their medical needs being forgotten and masks making communication difficult, to others' lack of social distancing making it harder to travel in public. Transport Focus's Transport User Panel found that, while most people surveyed about public transport in their local area rated the services as very or fairly good, disabled passengers were more likely to have a negative experience.

Main Digest

With only 31% of London Underground stations fully accessible in 2021, the network has only seen a 6.9% improvement in accessibility over two years.

Related:

The Covid-19 pandemic has had a drastic effect on the lives of disabled people. From their medical needs being forgotten and masks making communication difficult, to others' lack of social distancing making it harder to travel in public.

This latter point resonates with a research study run by specialist lawyers Bolt Burdon Kemp. They consistently found that commuter journeys taken via wheelchair took longer than the same journey taken by an able-bodied person. A new investigation has found that more still needs to be done on public transport for disabled people.

There's Only Been a 6.9% Improvement in Accessible Public Transport

According to Transport for London, 84 out of 270 stations are currently fully accessible (as of August 2021). 77 were listed as fully accessible when the law firm carried out their research in 2019. This means 29% of underground stations were accessible in 2019, and 31% in 2021 - an improvement of a mere 6.9% over two years.

This is despite the Transport Committee finding in October 2019 that "the connectivity of infrastructure and services across different transport modes and providers needs to be improved, in order to enhance the journey experience of disabled and older passengers."(1)

Reports by Transport Focus, the Department for Transport and the Research Institute for Disabled Consumers have uncovered that travelling on public transport continues to be difficult for disabled passengers.

Public Transport is Failing Disabled Passengers

Transport Focus's Transport User Panel found that, while most people surveyed about public transport in their local area rated the services as very or fairly good (70% disabled and 74% able-bodied), disabled passengers were more likely to have a negative experience.

For 1 in 5 Disabled People, Public Transport Felt Unsafe During Covid-19

When asked about travelling on public transport during Covid-19, disabled people expressed more trepidation than able-bodied people. Most notably, 1 in 5 (20%) disabled people said they felt unsafe (compared to 14% of able-bodied people). What's more, 67% of disabled people said they weren't aware of the various Transport for London lanyard schemes for people with hidden and/or visible disabilities.

2 in 5 (61%) Disabled People Will Likely Not Return to Using Public Transport After Covid-19

When asked by the Research Institute for Disabled Consumers, only 39% of disabled people expressed a willingness to return to using public transport once Covid-19 travel restrictions were fully relaxed. 52% said they were unsure. This is despite 74% of them stating they normally use public transport (either pre- or post-Covid-19 restrictions). The largest percentage who said they hadn't taken public transport after Covid-19 restrictions initially eased (as of August 2020), was in Scotland, at 44%.

The Behaviour of Other Passengers is a Major Worry for Disabled People

The Research Institute for Disabled Consumers also asked respondents what would encourage them to use public transport the most. The largest percentages - 28% each - said it would be if other passengers wore PPE (personal protective equipment) and if there was social distancing inside the vehicle. In comparison, the cleanliness of public transport was only chosen by 20% of respondents.

"The past 18 months have been incredibly challenging for the disabled community. Even before the pandemic, access to public transport was limited and now people are facing those difficult journeys whilst also feeling very exposed and at risk."

"When we commissioned our Going the Extra Mile campaign back in 2018 the results - that it took a wheelchair user longer to commute across London compared to an able-bodied person - were disappointing if not surprising."

"The fact that the disabled community is still struggling to safely access public transport is beyond frustrating. For some it will means increased costs as they are forced to rely on other forms of transport. For others these lost hours add up across a week and have a massive impact on their ability to work and enjoy the same amount of family and leisure time that the able-bodied community do."

"It is our hope that by continuing to shine a light on this ongoing issue that positive change may happen."
- Victoria Oliver, Head of the Spinal Injury team at BBK.

Methodology:

The following reports were used to find the statistics quoted: Accessible Transport: A Better Normal (July 2021 - Transport Focus); Disabled Passengers During the Pandemic (December 2020 - Transport Focus); Transport Disability and Accessibility Statistics England 2019-2020 (March 2021 - Department for Transport); Covid 19 Transport Summary Report (August 2020 - Research Institute for Disabled Consumers). Information on number of accessible stations was obtained from the TFL website.

Primary Information Source(s):

Only 31% of London Underground Stations are Fully Accessible | Bolt Burdon Kemp (boltburdonkemp.co.uk). Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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Cite This Page (APA): Bolt Burdon Kemp. (2021, September 9). Only 31% of London Underground Stations are Fully Accessible. Disabled World. Retrieved January 20, 2022 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/transport/public/london-underground.php