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Americans Most Likely to Share Covid-19 Fake Information

Published: 2022-11-08
Author: Simon Fraser University | Contact: sfu.ca
Peer-Reviewed Publication: Yes | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.51685/jqd.2022.024
Additional References: Library of Disability News in the Americas Publications

Synopsis: Americans are considerably more likely to share theories to promote or show support for them and use it as a way to connect with others. Those who identified as conservative and those that trusted the Trump government were more likely to share misinformation online. In Canada, the survey found that the number one reason people shared conspiracy theories online was for people to be aware of them, and the second-most common reason was to criticize them.

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Definition

Misinformation

Misinformation is incorrect or misleading information. It is differentiated from disinformation, which is deliberately deceptive. Rumors are information not attributed to any particular source and are unreliable and often unverified, but they can be either true or false. Social media has made information available to us anytime, connecting vast groups of people with their data at once. Even if later retracted, misinformation can continue to influence actions and memory. People may be more prone to believe misinformation because they are emotionally connected to what they are hearing or reading.

Main Digest

People living in the United States are more than three times more likely to share misinformation and conspiracy theories about COVID-19 than people in four other English-speaking countries, including Canada, a Simon Fraser University study has found.

Related Publications:

When the entire world stopped in early 2020 due to the pandemic, researchers were presented with a rare opportunity to study the sharing of the same conspiracy theories and other misinformation across multiple countries.

SFU political science professor Mark Pickup, along with colleagues from Colorado State University and McMaster University, focused on five Western, English-speaking democracies: the U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Researchers found that people in the U.S. were no more likely to report seeing misinformation than people living in any of the other countries but were three times more likely to share these theories with their followers.

"America is an outlier. Our findings are consistent with recent work about the outsized role that Americans play in sharing misinformation on social media," Pickup says.

According to the study, published in the Journal of Quantitative Description: Digital Media, there are a few reasons why Americans stand out from the other countries.

The banner displays the words Fake News. Social media has long been a venue where conspiracy theories and other misinformation incubate and spread, and Americans are considerably more likely to share it.The banner displays the words Fake News. Social media has long been a venue where conspiracy theories and other misinformation incubate and spread, and Americans are considerably more likely to share it.

While people in other countries self-reported that they shared misinformation to make other aware of them or to criticize them, Americans are considerably more likely to share theories to promote or show support for them and use it as a way to connect with others.

The polarized political landscape of the U.S., which also played out in debates about COVID-19, also correlated with the sharing of misinformation. Those who identified as conservative and those that trusted the Trump government were more likely to share misinformation online.

In all countries, those who have populist attitudes and distrust health officials were more likely to share misinformation than those who do not.

In Canada, the survey found that the number one reason people shared conspiracy theories online was for people to be aware of them and the second-most common reason was to criticize them.

Facebook was the most common platform for sharing misinformation, accounting for more than half of those sharing misinformation in each country.

The results are based on their study of thousands of nationally-representative surveys conducted in each country in July 2020 and January 2021.

Reference Source(s):

Americans Most Likely to Share Covid-19 Fake Information | Simon Fraser University (sfu.ca). Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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Cite This Page (APA): Simon Fraser University. (2022, November 8). Americans Most Likely to Share Covid-19 Fake Information. Disabled World. Retrieved November 28, 2022 from www.disabled-world.com/news/america/americans.php

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