Screen Readers Skip to Content
Tweet Facebook Buffer

Accessibility Features in Android 2.0 Platform

Author: Thomas C. Weiss : Contact: Disabled World

Published: 2010-01-17 : (Rev. 2019-06-03)

Synopsis:

Examines features and accessibility options in the Android 2.0 mobile phone platform.

Key Points:

Main Digest

Android 2.0 (Eclair) is a major improvement in Google's mobile OS. Android is actually a mobile operating system running on the Linux kernel. It was initially developed by Android Inc., a firm later purchased by Google, and lately by the Open Handset Alliance. It allows developers to write managed code in the Java language, controlling the device via Google-developed Java libraries.

Android 2.0 follows on from Android 1.6 "Donut", which introduced many new accessibility features designed to make Android apps more widely usable by blind and low-vision users. In brief, Android 1.6 includes a built-in screenreader and text-to-speech (TTS) engine which make it possible to use most Android applications, as well as all of Android's default UI, when not looking at the screen.

Android 2.0 Features

Android 2.0 Accessibility Features

Starting with Android 1.6, the Android platform includes a set of easy to use accessibility APIs that make it possible to create accessibility aids such as screen-readers for the blind.

The Android platform now comes with applications that provide spoken, auditory (non-speech sounds) and haptic (vibration) feedback. Named TalkBack, SoundBack and KickBack, these applications are available via the Settings - Accessibility menu.

Application authors can easily ensure that their applications remain usable by blind and visually impaired users by ensuring that all parts of the user interface are reachable via the trackball; and all image controls have associated textual meta-data.

Quick Contact for Android provides instant access to a contact's information and communication modes. For example, a user can tap a contact photo and select to call, SMS, or email the person. Other applications such as Email, Messaging, and Calendar can also reveal the Quick Contact widget when you touch a contact photo or status icon.

Android Version 2.0 is offers haptic feedback, (Haptic technology, or haptics, is a tactile feedback technology which takes advantage of a user's sense of touch by applying forces, vibrations, and/or motions upon the user), built-in and a brand new Accessibility option, plus a new option for Text-to-speech. Besides that, Android 2.0 gives users more control over the settings and more opportunities to customize it based on their preferences.

With the exception of brief update periods, Android has been available as open source since 21 October 2008. Google opened the entire source code (including network and telephony stacks) under an Apache License.

The first phone featuring Android 2.0 is the Droid from Verizon and Motorola.

It's not yet clear what other existing Android phones will be able to upgrade to Android 2.0, or when carriers will issue those software updates.

Over the next few months, we expect to see more and more Android devices being released. These devices will be running Android 1.5, 1.6, or 2.0.

Related Documents


Important:

Disabled World uses cookies to help provide and enhance our services to you and tailor some content and advertising. By continuing you agree to the Disabled World Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.

Disabled World is strictly a news and information website provided for general informational purpose only and does not constitute medical advice. Materials presented are in no way meant to be a substitute for professional medical care by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. Any 3rd party offering or advertising on disabled-world.com does not constitute endorsement by Disabled World.

Please report outdated or inaccurate information to us.